The Nightmare Came True

Be responsible for your choices.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Gustavo Fring from Pexels

Remember not too long ago when we could go on a vacation?

Even in current times, I went on vacation.

A “vacation.”

Let me clarify. My husband was in his busy season at work. We’ve been confined together for so long that even the dog needs some alone time. Everyone was sick of being stuck together and longed for a change, even if it was only a change in location. Hard as we tried, we couldn’t rent an Airbnb anywhere.

We all longed for some semblance of normalcy. My Dad extended an invitation to spend some time with him at his vacation home. He also invited other family members, and all of them had been safe. Everyone had taken precautions, and no one had gone back to an office setting. We had all been “safe” in quarantine, so we agreed to gather with other family members who had taken the same precautions. …


Even when the old is relatively new

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Remember when the music source was an external item? Throwback to days not so long ago when vinyl records, CDs, and cassette tapes, and how they are making a comeback. Now the things we used to play for music are often used as trendy ways to decorate and achieve the right vibe.

We went on a short road trip to change scenery for a bit. One of my daughters woke up early, found the blu-ray player, and was watching a DVD by the time we woke up. The irony of watching the movie Hackers and being excited about using old technology. …


Give cheerfully without overgiving.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Time says just thinking about giving makes you feel good about yourself. This thinking makes sense when you consider a study that says people who win money are happier when they spend it on people other than themselves. When people share what they have, goodness flows out of them.

Goodness, kind of like the sap that comes from a maple tree, runs over. If you’ve ever observed a maple tree, the sap oozes from the inside-out. Sap is the sugar produced in a tree’s leaves by the process of photosynthesis, mixed with water brought up through the tree’s roots, according to gardeners. That’s a simplified process of the science behind the ooey-gooey goodness that makes maple syrup. …


Be thankful for weird stuff.

Image for post
Image for post
It’s the little things, like coffee: Photo by wewe yang from Pexels

No one needs a newsflash to be aware that times are weird. To say everything is different is an understatement. One poll suggests that Americans think their own gratitude is increasing, while everyone else’s is going down. Also noted, is that married couples are more grateful than single people, and both of those groups are more grateful than people age 18–24.

The phrase ‘desperate times call for desperate measures’ takes on new meaning as we all attempt to navigate uncertainty. The words are most often attributed to Hippocrates and may have come from his work Amorphisms, in which he wrote:

“For extreme diseases, extreme methods of cure, as to restriction, are most suitable.” …


Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

We know social media is bad for us. There’s nothing revolutionary about this news, but you may not realize how harmful it is to your psyche. Science says the use of social media is detrimental to your mindset, especially if the desired approval and validation are not forthcoming.

We see the effects across most social platforms, but some are worse than others. Which platforms are the worst for adverse effects? A new report, #StatusofMind, published by the Royal Society for Public Health, out of the UK, names Instagram as the most detrimental to young people’s mental health.


Offering compassion and dignity to those with mental health issues.

Image for post
Image for post
Nurse Ratched: Wikipedia, royalty-free.

Nurse Ratched is given a first name, Mildred, in the modern Netflix tale, but she’s based on the “Big Nurse” character from the famous novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey. The surge of activity around the character has a lot of people asking whether she’s a real person. You’ll never hear her real name on any crime beat, but both the book depiction and movie character are based on a real person.

Author Ken Kesey tells Time, Nurse Ratched is based on a woman from a job he held after college. Kesey was no angel himself. He voluntarily agreed to be a subject in government studies involving hallucinogenic drugs and LSD to supplement his income. Later he was arrested for marijuana possession and a subsequent faked suicide, for which he was imprisoned for five months. …


Loving man’s best friend.

Image for post
Image for post
Old Friend: Photo by Pixabay from Pexels

Dog lovers are often saddened as years advance and their dogs become less spry than they used to be. Our hearts break as the energetic pups we brought home calm down. Before long, we start seeing grey around the muzzles, and stiff joints that pop and crack as they move. You’re probably familiar with the idea that a dog ages seven years to each one year of human life. The good news is that science is changing this thinking, even calling it flawed.

There’s an age calculation that might make your head spin a little unless you’re a mathematician. To calculate your dog’s age, you must now multiply the natural logarithm of a dog’s age in human years by 16 and then add 31. My dog is 10. Let’s do the math. The natural logarithm of 10 is 2.30. I’ve forgotten, long ago how to calculate logarithms — crediting Google for solving the logarithm for me. 2.30 multiplied by 16, is 36.8. Add 31. My dog is 67.8 years old, not 70. …


Renew your mind with silence.

Image for post
Image for post
Quiet, please: Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

They say laughter is good medicine. I agree wholeheartedly, but for me, silence is some of the best medicine I can give to myself. A little self-care, if you will allow the thought. You’ve probably heard “silence is golden,” but what you may not know is that there’s more to the idiom than those three precious words. The full phrase is:

“Speech is silver, but silence is golden.”

The earliest origins of the phrase come to us by 1831, poet and historian Thomas Carlyle, who translated it from German to English in his novel Sartor Resartus. And the perspective is different when you look at the whole meaning. Talking is good, but listening is better. If you’ll allow the indulgence, silence is more than the sundae, but the sundae with the cherry on top of it. …


Build deeper connections.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Catherine Hammond on Unsplash

Our kids grew up teething on books. Not only the plastic kind that kids gum on before they have teeth, but the early childhood ones that have single words like ball on one page. Kids gummed up the spines of their earliest favorite books into soggy messes. Pages would fall out of books that were read often. Many homes have kids’ toys spread about, but our home was littered with books. Books were on shelves, in toys boxes, under beds, and on coffee tables. Books were woven into the fabric of our lives.

One study tells us children ages eight to ten discovered that reading creates new white matter in the brain, which improves system-wide communication. White matter is the tissue that carries information to other parts of the brain and processes information more efficiently. …


Keep the magic alive.

Image for post
Image for post
Santa: Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Many children I know look forward to sitting on Santa’s lap and telling him about their wish list. In the US, about 85% of young children believe in Santa, according to CNN. One report says 526,000,000 kids, under the age of 14 celebrate Christmas. If you believe in magic, it’s no problem for Santa to visit 22 million kids an hour, every hour, on the night before Christmas. That’s about 365,000 kids a minute; about 6,100 a second.

Since 2008, Macy’s and Make-A-Wish have partnered to raise funds and grant wishes to help critically ill children in its “Believe” campaign, but Believe Day isn’t on the calendar. …

About

Nicole Akers

Founder of Publishous. Mom of 2. Helps writers write better. Get my book, Make Money on Medium: Build Your Audience & Grow Your Income: https://amzn.to/2WI48e8

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store